Cambridge School of Art

Degree Show Website

Leo Cinicolo
(click image to enlarge)

‘Portraits Of Actors In Role’

(The Cinematic Aesthetic)

The ‘suspension of disbelief’ we experience during a cinematic experience envelopes us in a fictional world. However the ’photographic’ experience is quite different. It is fixed and permanent; a record that exists always in the past.

While shooting this project the actors were given a plot and each scene was played out in full. Through being writer, director and photographer I greatly encouraged the actors to improvise and enter their character fully.

By evoking the ‘cinematic aesthetic’ in the series the photographs mimic freeze-frames taken from a film, inverting the idea of a photographic ‘fixed’ moment, and so exploring the chronology of the image. However, the ambiguity of the unknown plot forces the viewer to project their own emotions and experiences onto the characters, thus cultivating individual readings and formulation of narrative.

This exercise focuses attention on the both the photographic process, and, more importantly, the skill of the actor in living out a fictitious persona, as, through their every gesture they enrich each image.

I would like to thank my actors, Leoni Kibbey, Roy Scammell, Ed Blackwell and Scott Pilkington-Bennett. I would also like to thank Ari Pazzi-Axworthy for the incredibly kind donation of her family’s home as a location.

‘Portraits Of Actors In Role’

(The Cinematic Aesthetic)

The ‘suspension of disbelief’ we experience during a cinematic experience envelopes us in a fictional world. However the ’photographic’ experience is quite different. It is fixed and permanent; a record that exists always in the past.

While shooting this project the actors were given a plot and each scene was played out in full. Through being writer, director and photographer I greatly encouraged the actors to improvise and enter their character fully.

By evoking the ‘cinematic aesthetic’ in the series the photographs mimic freeze-frames taken from a film, inverting the idea of a photographic ‘fixed’ moment, and so exploring the chronology of the image. However, the ambiguity of the unknown plot forces the viewer to project their own emotions and experiences onto the characters, thus cultivating individual readings and formulation of narrative.

This exercise focuses attention on the both the photographic process, and, more importantly, the skill of the actor in living out a fictitious persona, as, through their every gesture they enrich each image.

I would like to thank my actors, Leoni Kibbey, Roy Scammell, Ed Blackwell and Scott Pilkington-Bennett. I would also like to thank Ari Pazzi-Axworthy for the incredibly kind donation of her family’s home as a location.

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